How far can you hit the ball?

I was reading an article by Paula Moldenhauer (Stopping at Second, Crosswalk.com) in which she described a scene where a young boy so amazed at how far he hit the ball, stood on second base watching the ball.  Meanwhile the fans, the coach and his team mates frantically encouraged him to run on to third.  Paula so aptly put the scene in terms of keeping his eyes on the coach would have put him in scoring position.

As fathers, most of us know the feeling of desperately trying to get our children’s attention in a effort to help them improve their position.  Too many times have I tried to explain the faults of a logical position taken by one of my children only to have them continue to move along the same path, often taking the more painful approach to the learning they were destined to receive.

I even remember my own father and mother trying to “talk some sense” into me.  We often seem to be so focused on what we have done and where it is taking us, that we miss the opportunity to realize a greater blessing.  As fathers we are often focused on providing a life for our family, so much so, that we often miss the whole experience of fatherhood.  We watch as the ball of our career, or accomplishments, or even self pursuits, flies higher and higher.  We are so amazed at what we have done that we take our eyes off the coach and miss the real opportunity to make a lasting difference in the lives of our children and families.

Keeping our eyes on the coach is the true discipline.  More often than not overlooked or ignored.  Psalms 105:4-5 tells us; “Keep your eyes open for God, watch for his works; be alert for signs of his presence. Remember the world of wonders he has made, his miracles, and the verdicts he’s rendered.”  If we grow beyond the stage of the amazed little boy, into the stage of the strong disciplined father, we will know that every ball we hit will surely be a home run.

En servicio como padre

Dave

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